Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Now We Know: RF Radiation Can Cause Cancer


For more than fifty years, electrical engineers and the telecom companies they work for have assured us that radio-frequency radiation, or RFR, is not strong enough to cause cell mutations resulting in cancer.

But over the past few months, several large peer-reviewed studies have cast serious doubt on that
assertion.

A study released last year by the National Toxicology Program of the National Institutes of Health found that lab animals who were exposed to RF radiation for long periods of time had a statistically higher rate of certain types of cancer than animals that were not exposed.

Then last week another major study of more than 2400 animals showed that long-term exposure simulating typical cell tower exposure resulted in higher rates of brain and heart tumors than the control group.

And just in case you thought these animals were being blasted with ultra-high levels of radiation, both of these studies looked at levels of radiation that were actually lower than our current government standards.

So now we know that RF radiation is capable of causing cancer. Now the question is, how much radiation can humans endure before cells are impacted?  And exactly how much radiation is being emitted by the various devices we use every day, as well as the wireless transmitters that dot the landscape of our lives, sending and receiving signals from those devices?

Watch this space.



Report of final results regarding brain and heart tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed from prenatal life until natural death to mobile phone radiofrequency field representative of a 1.8 GHz GSM base station environmental emission 

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